Fred1 picSo a few years back, I was at Daytona Beach, Florida, with a companion, mid Summer time.  Typical beach scene.  Lot’s of sunbathers, kids frolicking in the water.  As it happened, we were in the water, cooling down ourselves when suddenly my companion asked me, rather abruptly, kinda like the possibility suddenly hit her.  Are there sharks in these waters?

Now being that we were in the Atlantic Ocean, and that I am not prone to lie or mislead.  And also knowing by the tone of the question, she (my companion) was not comfortable with the realization that she already knew the answer to the question and even then was pondering a dignified exit strategy.   Soooo, I paused and carefully thought out my answer.

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Fred1 picA most excellent question.  There is a misnomer in the industry that once you become an Open Water (OW) Diver, you should first log some dives before going for you Advance Open Water (AOW) Card.  Though that is certainly an option, it is not the rule.  In Open Water class we teach you the basics.  To be good, like in many sports, you need practice, and repetition is king!

 

Once you have graduated from Open Water (OW) you need to get back into the water.  If you wait four to six months, or even longer, you will forget what you were taught.  Not only will you be a danger to yourself, but to your buddy as well.   How to get back into the water is the question.  You can grab one of your classmates or a diver friend and go.  But a more popular option is to enroll in the PADI Advance Open Water Class right away.  Many Argonaut Diving OW graduates take the AOW class within weeks of graduating from OW.  In fact we are running a special this summer that if you purchase and pass OW class you get AOW class for free (does not include scuba gear).

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situational awareness 

There are many skills in scuba to master.  One of the most important, and one that often causes divers grief, is a lack of situational awareness.  Even though the oceans we delve into are vast, we need to have awareness of what is immediately around us.  Here is just a short list of some of the more obvious, but often violated.

 

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Fred1 picWhether you are diving in the Emerald Sea or somewhere tropical, currents are a fact of life.  And they will threaten that life if you are not prepared.

Before getting into an ocean environment you should be asking about Tides and Currents.  If you are not familiar with them, then ask your local dive shop or consult local Tide and Current tables.  There are even apps you can download to assist you.  Even if you are prepared, sometimes Mother Nature will throw you a curveball anyway.

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Fred1 picA lot of the great dive sites here in Puget Sound and up in British Columbia are only accessible by boat.  As a Diver, you need to be well versed in boat etiquette when schlepping your gear on board the dive charter.  Here are some helpful tips.

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